Władysław Starewicz/Ladislas Starevich/Владислав Старевич

I already posted about his Tale of the Fox & The Cameraman’s Revenge

also, there’s a documentary about him

text from The Big Cartoon Database

Born Władysław Starewicz in Moscow, Russia, he was raised by his grandmother on the Baltic coast. As the director of a natural history museum in Kaunas, Lithuania, he made a few live-action films before attempting stop-motion. For the fifth film, Starewicz wanted to document the battle of two stag beetles, but was frustrated when he found that the nocturnal creatures would go to sleep whenever the stage lighting was turned on. Inspired by a viewing of Les Allumettes Animées [Animated Matches] (1908) by Emile Cohl, Starewicz decided to re-create the fight through stop-motion animation: he removed the legs and mandibles from two beetle carcasses, then re-attached them with wax, creating articulated puppets. The result was the short film Walka Żuków (1910), the first animated puppet film with a plot(…).

In 1911, Starewicz moved to Moscow and began work with the film company of Aleksandr Khanzhonkov. There he made two dozen films, most of them puppet animations using dead animals. Strekoza I Muravei [The Grasshopper and the Ant] (1911) got Starewicz decorated by the czar. The best-known film of this period, perhaps of his entire career, was Miest Kinooperatora Operatora (The Cameraman’s Revenge) (1912), a dark and cynical look at infidelity and jealousy among the insects.

Like most of the Russian film community at the time, Starewicz sided with the White Army. After the October Revolution of 1917, he was forced to flee from Moscow to Yalta on the Black Sea. After a brief stay, Starewicz and his family fled before the Red Army could capture the Crimea, stopping in Italy for a while before joining the Russian émigrés in Paris. There, Władysław Starewicz changed his name to Ladislas Starevich, finding it easier to pronounce in French. He made one animated film with his old comrades in the French capital before moving on to Fontenay-sous-Bois and his own independent production house.

heysawbones:

somebody wake me up when “ironic” “”misandry”” isn’t trendy anymore, please

I didn’t even know such a thing existed and now I googled it and oh my god that is disgusting

Tags: misandry

I made a Vietnamese Walking Stick family.
L to R: older daughter, younger daughter, aunt, mom, grandma
Not sure what I’ll do with them, but expect more art of these guys tomorrow.

I made a Vietnamese Walking Stick family.

L to R: older daughter, younger daughter, aunt, mom, grandma

Not sure what I’ll do with them, but expect more art of these guys tomorrow.

felis-chaus:

Jungle Cat by a.lookinphoto

baby jungle cat, you guys.

felis-chaus:

Jungle Cat by a.lookinphoto

baby jungle cat, you guys.

I’m starting a new thing on this blog: Old Art Saturdays. So that you can laugh with me at various old things I dig up from my folders. If you’d like to post your own old stuff, feel free to use the old art saturdays tag.
I think this is the oldest drawing I own, from 2003. I was 9 when I drew this. I drew it on a ferry, going back to Zadar from Iž. I drew the various sea creatures that I saw on the island. Fun times! It’s called “The Sea Collection”.

I’m starting a new thing on this blog: Old Art Saturdays. So that you can laugh with me at various old things I dig up from my folders. If you’d like to post your own old stuff, feel free to use the old art saturdays tag.

I think this is the oldest drawing I own, from 2003. I was 9 when I drew this. I drew it on a ferry, going back to Zadar from Iž. I drew the various sea creatures that I saw on the island. Fun times! It’s called “The Sea Collection”.

ref
charcoal on toned paper
I hate drawing feet :/

ref

charcoal on toned paper

I hate drawing feet :/

posemaniacs day #6… I used several different kinds of charcoal for this set..

^video is translated to English

See list.

I’ll post the ones I liked best first, in chronological order (then the rest from the list, also chronologically).

Miest Kinooperatora (The Cameraman’s Revenge), Władysław Starewicz, 1912

Alternate spellings of the author’s name: Ladislas Starevich, Владисла́в Старе́вич (Vladislav Starevich)

Russian title: Месть Kинематографического Oператора

Starewicz was a pioneer of stop-motion animation. His movie Walka Żuków (The Battle of the Stag Beetles, 1910) is generally considered to be the first stop-motion film with an actual plot. He’s famous for using dead insects instead of puppets, as can be seen in Walka Żuków, The Beautiful Lukanida (Прекрасная Люканида, 1912) and one of his most famous movies, Miest Kinooperatora.

Starewicz was born in Moscow to Polish parents and grew up in Kaunas (now in Lithuania).  In 1911 he moved to Moscow and started working in a company owned by Aleksandr Khanzhonkov (Алекса́ндр Ханжо́нков), Russia’s first cinema entrepreneur. In this company Starewicz created his famous insect animations, including Miest Kinooperatora.

Bendazzi’s list

Giannalberto Bendazzi is a historian and critic of animation and in 1999 he was asked to assemble a list of 84 most important movies in the history of animation. (This list was assembled for an animation festival and he had some time limits set and whatnot, so this explains why they’re mostly short films.)

I’ll post the entire list here, and I’ll update this post with links as I write about the individual cartoons.

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