Bendazzi’s list.

Gertie the Dinosaur by Winsor McCay, 1914

(text from Wikipedia)

Although Gertie is popularly thought to be the earliest animated film, McCay had earlier made Little Nemo (1911) and How a Mosquito Operates (1912). The American J. Stuart Blackton and the French Émile Cohl had experimented with animation even earlier; Gertie being a character with an appealing personality distinguished McCay’s film from these earlier “trick films”. Gertie was the first film to use animation techniques such as keyframes, registration marks, tracing paper, the Mutoscope action viewer, and animation loops. (…)

McCay was concerned with accurate timing and motion; he timed his own breathing to determine the timing of Gertie’s breathing, and included subtle details such as the ground sagging beneath Gertie’s great weight.[29] McCay consulted with New York museum staff to ensure the accuracy of Gertie’s movements; the staff were unable to help him find out how an extinct animal would stand up from a lying position, so in a scene in which Gertie stood up, McCay had a flying lizard come on screen to draw away viewers’ attention.(…)

McCay originally used a version of the film as part of his vaudeville act.[k] (…) Standing to the right of the film screen, he introduced “the only dinosaur in captivity”. As the film started Gertie poked her head out of a cave, and McCay encouraged her to come forward. He reinforced the illusion with tricks such as tossing a cardboard apple at the screen, at which point he turned his back to the audience and pocketed the apple as it appeared in the film for Gertie to eat.[m] For the finale, McCay walked offstage from where he “reappeared” in the film; Gertie lifted up the animated McCay, placed him on her back, and walked away as McCay bowed to the audience.

ref
turns out that fancy, expensive fixative also melts away chalk. great. and this one actually looked pretty good…you know, while the chalk was still there

ref

turns out that fancy, expensive fixative also melts away chalk. great. and this one actually looked pretty good…you know, while the chalk was still there

posemaniacs, day #7

charcoal + chalk

sorry for the awful photos, I don’t have a scanner :/

also it turns out that hairspray destroys/melts/whatever chalk. good to know!

thunderstorms12:

image

IT HAS HAPPENED!! TIME TO DO THE THING

Ok first of all thank you all very very much for 100 followers it is fantastic to have reached that many in the 4 months that I have had this blog. Now we shall celebrate in a fashion that includes all of you. Not sure there will be any interest at all,…

justplainsomething asked: Do you know of any ancient cultures outside of Roman and Greek (and not European obviously) with myths about humans becoming immortal? I'm trying to do character building for a story about immortals in the modern world and I want to have as much diversity as possible (aka NOT just Romans and Greeks), but I haven't found much yet and also don't want to bend other cultures' myths to fit my ideas, either. Anyway, I think your blog is great and thanks for the help.

medievalpoc:

socpuppet:

medievalpoc:

Immortality and the origin of death is one of the most popular topics of stories from around the world, actually. Often immortality is or can be conferred on average humans by eating or drinking a rare and special kind of food or beverage.

In the Islamic world you have the four immortals, including Khidir, the Green Man, who drank from the water of life and became immortal. Khidir’s tale shares some factors in common with the story of The Wandering Jew. You can read more about him and the other immortals here.

In China you have the Covert Eight Immortals:

whose power can be transferred to tools an used to destroy evil ro bestow life; as well as the Eight Immortal Scholars of Huainan, or the Eight Gentlemen, who aren’t deified or made supernatural in any way, as their “immortality” is a metaphor but I think that’s a fun play for fiction. As well as Emperor Qin Shi Huang, who famously spent much of his life searching for an elixir of immortality.

There are a fair amount of Native American tales that deal with this topic, too. The Boy Who Would Be Immortal is a Hočąk story, with analogues in Macmac, Menominee, and Potawotami, with their theme of fasting. If you plan to include immortals that blend with supernatural tales, Wendigo are certainly immortal (humans become Wendigo by breaking taboos or committing terrible crimes), as are Skin Walkers in Navajo legend.

In Vietnam, Hang Nga and Hau Nghe are made immortal by eating a special type of grass. Separate from this, you have the Vietnamese Four Immortals: the giant boy Thánh Gióng, mountain god Tản Viên Sơn Thánh,Chử Đồng Tử the marsh boy, and the princess Liễu Hạnh.

In both Hindu and Buddhist tales, the elixir of immortality is guarded jealously by the gods and Garuda, the mythological bird person, plays a very important role in these kind of stories in Southeast Asia.

Another linking theme is the Tree of Life, which many cultures have in common, from Yggdrasil to the Mesoamerican World Tree.

There’s a Yoruban tale about Oba Koso or Shango, who was forced to commit suicide by political intrigue but did not hang; The demigod Maui has many stories his quests involving immortality for himself and others in Tonga, New Zealand, Samoa, and many other Pacific Islands.

Also keep in mind, even if you’re going to allow Greek or Roman immortals to dominate your story-not all Greek or Roman immortals were white people. A notable exception is Memnon, an African (Ethiopian and/or Sudanese) king, who was killed by Achilles and mourned so deeply by Eos, his mother, that Zeus was moved to grant him immortality.

I highly encourage anyone else to add their favorite stories about immortality to this post!!!

I’m not sure if someone’s already mentioned it, but there’s a Japanese folktale about how if you eat the flesh of a mermaid (person-fish, 人魚), you’ll become immortal.

There’s a brief passage about the original story here (which started showing up in the Edo/Tokugawa period [~1600-1868]) and a general entry from the Obakemono Project which now, sadly, can only be accessed by the WayBack Machine, but sports a very nice citations list. 

image

image

[x]

i just

mermaid meat

How about Koschei the Immortal from Slavic mythology? It is European, but it’s not Roman, nor Greek. He’s technically not immortal, but he’s pretty good at holding onto life, since he stored his soul within a needle that’s inside an egg, which is in a duck, which is in a hare, and the hare is inside a chest buried under a tree on some island in the middle of the ocean.

naturepunk:

shart-nado:

cyberbullys:

katorade27:

I CANT FUCKING BREATHE MY BROTHER HAD TO DO A BIOLOGY PRESENTATION ON BIRDS AND HE HAD TO USE A VIDEO IN HIS PRESENTATION AND HE CHOSE THIS VIDEO BECAUSE HE WAS CONVINCED THIS WAS A REAL BIRD 

OH MY GOD

It just gets BETTER AND BETTER

Brilliance

oh my god I nearly choked this is hilarious

(for those of you who haven’t seen the original video, here it is)

(Source: urbanclictionary)

I wanted to upload that picture from yesterday without the color layer, cause I think the shading looks neat
All the textures used are from my own photos and you can find them under my ‘creative commons’ tag.

I wanted to upload that picture from yesterday without the color layer, cause I think the shading looks neat

All the textures used are from my own photos and you can find them under my ‘creative commons’ tag.

Tags: process idk

bigcatawareness:

mirtabrkulj:

Here’s the rant I promised >.>;

For part 1 about white lions (general info, what they are..) click here.

For the website I’m criticizing, click here.

"Mystery of the White Lions: Children of the Sun God" on Amazon (I *dare* you to read the product description & “about the author”)

Melanin and health - resources:

-AZA policy on selecting for rare recessive alleles (abundant with examples + studies you can check out)

-study that describes a white lion cub born with defects that had up to that point been only described in inbred domestic cats

-study that describes the link between melanin & immunity in owls (more melanin=better immune system)

-detailed explanation of the link between coat color and deafness in domestic cats

-study that describes how white cats are more likely to develop cancer because they are less protected from sunlight


The mutation that causes white lions:

-you can find it in this study (it’s a Tyrosinase mutation)

The story about the meteor & the myth of the origin of white lions:

-it’s an interesting myth, but I can’t seem to find a source other than the book “Mystery of the White Lions..”. Every link on the net mentions it in context with white lions. Who recorded this story? When? Where? In any case, I love mythology and I always find ancient alien stories fun. So, read it! It’s fun. But the fact that the GWLPT takes is seriously is scary. I’m kind of getting convinced that they’re actually some sort of a crazy religious cult.

… questions?

And here we have Mirta knocking it out of the park again.

Oh gosh it’s been so long since I made a proper digital illustration. Feels good to be back!
Anyway, my walking stick character (Older Daughter) is back, with an entomology book. Yay!
I made this available on Soc6 in case you want to buy a fancy Ipod case for that friend of yours who’s really into entomology. I am great at marketing, aren’t I? (btw soc6 has free worldwide shipping today)

Oh gosh it’s been so long since I made a proper digital illustration. Feels good to be back!

Anyway, my walking stick character (Older Daughter) is back, with an entomology book. Yay!

I made this available on Soc6 in case you want to buy a fancy Ipod case for that friend of yours who’s really into entomology. I am great at marketing, aren’t I? (btw soc6 has free worldwide shipping today)

Some time ago I uploaded some photos on WikiCommons, so I thought I’d repost all of them here, under my ‘creative commons’ tag.

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

These are from my collection of bones and such:

-> the biggest skull is that of a dog. Because I have a bad sense of humor, I named him Hamlet. I found him by the side of a high-traffic road and like half of his skull is missing, so I presume he was roadkill. When I found him, he was just bones and some moss. I only kept the skull.

-> On the third picture you can see Hamlet, a rat skull I found on the beach and a mouse skull of a mouse my cat killed.

-> The fourth picture also features some large teeth I found in an abandoned building (cow teeth maybe?, a broken cat mandible (found it near the place I found Hamlet, presumably roadkill, those were the most complete bones left), the skull of a blackbird that my cat killed (Turdus merula), two fish teeth my dad gave to me and the spine and mandible of a lizard (Podarcis siculus), also my cat’s doing

->dead bug I found (Oryctes nasicornis)